DUSK

Posted:  October 08, 2022
SDHQ BUILD SCORE: 
Cloud Saves
Native Linux
SDHQ Settings
Review
Game Info

SDHQ Recommended Settings

SteamOS
60 FPS
Limit
60
Refresh Rate
HRS
No
TDP Limit
No
Scaling Filter
Linear
GPU Clock
Disabled
Proton Version

No forced compatibility

Game Settings

Resolution: 1280x800

VSync: Off

Framerate Cap: Uncapped

Bilinear Filtering: Off

Bloom: Off

Light Flares: On

Retro Palette: Off

Low Spec Mode: Off

Pixelation: 2x

Projected Battery Usage and Temp
6W - 7.5W
55c - 60c
6 hours

Review

During the past decade, there was a renaissance of retro first-person shooters, which were coined by many as “boomer shooters”. Developed by David Szymanski as an homage to Redneck Rampage and Quake, DUSK was born and became one of the finest boomer shooters of this generation.

Beginning in the outskirts of the rural fictional town of Dusk, Pennsylvania, you’ll traverse through dark and desolate farmlands, Ukrainian and Chernobyl Zone inspired factories, and massive cathedrals, with a goal to blast cultists away with a fantastic arsenal of weapons at your disposal. You’ll also make your way through damp and rustic swamps and sewers, cause let’s be honest, a retro FPS can’t be a retro FPS without either a swamp or sewer level, so this one has both! The game has this very nice Lovecraftian feel to it, which is a nice breath of fresh air from all these modern military FPS games out there! Andrew Hulshult’s awesome music also helps with painting the atmosphere, and the tunes range from weird ambient sounds to face-melting heavy metal bangers, which make you feel like a god as you demolish your enemies with haste.

The Deck Experience:

DUSK was recently listed as Verified, and after playing it for myself on the Steam Deck, it feels like one of those perfect games to play on Deck. The publisher of DUSK, New Blood Interactive, put a ton of care into the game, which is apparent from the incredible Linux build that was created. 

While I am new to the Deck, and am garbage at DUSK with a controller, I managed to get the hang of it fairly quickly and it feels great to play! It definitely helped that the developer added a weapon wheel, which can be activated holding down RB, to effortlessly switch weapons when in combat. This definitely was a godsend!

DUSK Out of the Box:

DUSK supports the Deck’s native 1280 x 800 resolution out of the box, and it runs amazingly well. Locked at 40fps, in the most demanding level of the campaign I’ve played so far, E2M1, idle wattage is around 6 watts and heavy combat with a lot of particles and effects on screen draws around 6.5 - 7 watts on average, so you can expect to get around 5 ½ to 7 hours of battery life, depending on how heavy the scenes are. 

However, shifting the game up to a 60fps cap is more demanding on the Deck, with the power draw being slightly higher with the heavy combat reaching up to 9 watts, with an expected 4 - 5 hours of battery life, so if you value battery life over performance, I’d recommend locking the game to 40fps. Otherwise, the increase to 60 makes a big difference for not a ton of compromises, so I would stick to 60 in general.

The Deck itself ran surprisingly very cool at most times, with idle temperatures being around 35 - 40 degrees celsius and heavy combat reaching up to 55 - 60 degrees celsius. During testing, I noticed that the FPS cap didn’t seem to change this number at all, but your mileage may vary depending on what level you are playing on. However, from what I’ve played, I can say with confidence that my experience on the Deck is really solid.

DUSK at Max Settings:

DUSK’s graphics settings are fairly minimal with most to do with Field of View, which is very appreciated), and filtering that changes the look of the game with different colours. Out of the box, every setting was turned on, apart from Bilinear Filtering and Bloom which were turned off by default. After turning these on, I revisited the same level to see if there were any differences in performance, temperatures and power draw, and on the max settings, the power draw increased to around 9.6 watts when locked to 60fps, and around 8 watts when locked to 40fps. Thermal temperatures stayed the same, with temps running around 55 - 60 degrees celsius.

DUSK 40 FPS Max
DUSK at 40 FPS Max Settings
DUSK at 60 FPS Max Settings

Conclusion:

DUSK has been one of my most fondest gaming experiences in the past few years, whether on my desktop Linux PC or on my Steam Deck. It’s a really cool game that is a ton of fun to play. On top of that, it has a kickass soundtrack that, paired with how easy it is to run, is easily one of my favorite FPS experiences so far! I think DUSK will go down in history as a classic a few years down the line when the next generation of aspiring game developers are looking at games for influence. DUSK is the perfect example of an FPS done right! It has made its way into my Top 5 favourite games of all time.

Plus, I have to give props to David Szymanski for developing such a high quality Linux build for DUSK. For fans of full native Linux ports and some damn good games, keep New Blood Interactive on your radar. The performance on the Steam Deck is near flawless and is truly a wonder to play. If you enjoy FPS games, I can guarantee DUSK will be an unforgettable experience. 

SDHQ's Build Score Breakdown

DUSK has been one of my most fondest gaming experiences in the past few years, so it is amazing how well it plays on the Steam Deck!

Performance: 
VISUALS: 
Stability: 
Controls: 
Battery: 
Reviewed By:
Kazuki sensei
Steam Profile
Steam Deck Compatibility
Current Price: 
$19.99
View in Steam Store
Proton DB Rating

Review

During the past decade, there was a renaissance of retro first-person shooters, which were coined by many as “boomer shooters”. Developed by David Szymanski as an homage to Redneck Rampage and Quake, DUSK was born and became one of the finest boomer shooters of this generation.

Beginning in the outskirts of the rural fictional town of Dusk, Pennsylvania, you’ll traverse through dark and desolate farmlands, Ukrainian and Chernobyl Zone inspired factories, and massive cathedrals, with a goal to blast cultists away with a fantastic arsenal of weapons at your disposal. You’ll also make your way through damp and rustic swamps and sewers, cause let’s be honest, a retro FPS can’t be a retro FPS without either a swamp or sewer level, so this one has both! The game has this very nice Lovecraftian feel to it, which is a nice breath of fresh air from all these modern military FPS games out there! Andrew Hulshult’s awesome music also helps with painting the atmosphere, and the tunes range from weird ambient sounds to face-melting heavy metal bangers, which make you feel like a god as you demolish your enemies with haste.

The Deck Experience:

DUSK was recently listed as Verified, and after playing it for myself on the Steam Deck, it feels like one of those perfect games to play on Deck. The publisher of DUSK, New Blood Interactive, put a ton of care into the game, which is apparent from the incredible Linux build that was created. 

While I am new to the Deck, and am garbage at DUSK with a controller, I managed to get the hang of it fairly quickly and it feels great to play! It definitely helped that the developer added a weapon wheel, which can be activated holding down RB, to effortlessly switch weapons when in combat. This definitely was a godsend!

DUSK Out of the Box:

DUSK supports the Deck’s native 1280 x 800 resolution out of the box, and it runs amazingly well. Locked at 40fps, in the most demanding level of the campaign I’ve played so far, E2M1, idle wattage is around 6 watts and heavy combat with a lot of particles and effects on screen draws around 6.5 - 7 watts on average, so you can expect to get around 5 ½ to 7 hours of battery life, depending on how heavy the scenes are. 

However, shifting the game up to a 60fps cap is more demanding on the Deck, with the power draw being slightly higher with the heavy combat reaching up to 9 watts, with an expected 4 - 5 hours of battery life, so if you value battery life over performance, I’d recommend locking the game to 40fps. Otherwise, the increase to 60 makes a big difference for not a ton of compromises, so I would stick to 60 in general.

The Deck itself ran surprisingly very cool at most times, with idle temperatures being around 35 - 40 degrees celsius and heavy combat reaching up to 55 - 60 degrees celsius. During testing, I noticed that the FPS cap didn’t seem to change this number at all, but your mileage may vary depending on what level you are playing on. However, from what I’ve played, I can say with confidence that my experience on the Deck is really solid.

DUSK at Max Settings:

DUSK’s graphics settings are fairly minimal with most to do with Field of View, which is very appreciated), and filtering that changes the look of the game with different colours. Out of the box, every setting was turned on, apart from Bilinear Filtering and Bloom which were turned off by default. After turning these on, I revisited the same level to see if there were any differences in performance, temperatures and power draw, and on the max settings, the power draw increased to around 9.6 watts when locked to 60fps, and around 8 watts when locked to 40fps. Thermal temperatures stayed the same, with temps running around 55 - 60 degrees celsius.

DUSK 40 FPS Max
DUSK at 40 FPS Max Settings
DUSK at 60 FPS Max Settings

Conclusion:

DUSK has been one of my most fondest gaming experiences in the past few years, whether on my desktop Linux PC or on my Steam Deck. It’s a really cool game that is a ton of fun to play. On top of that, it has a kickass soundtrack that, paired with how easy it is to run, is easily one of my favorite FPS experiences so far! I think DUSK will go down in history as a classic a few years down the line when the next generation of aspiring game developers are looking at games for influence. DUSK is the perfect example of an FPS done right! It has made its way into my Top 5 favourite games of all time.

Plus, I have to give props to David Szymanski for developing such a high quality Linux build for DUSK. For fans of full native Linux ports and some damn good games, keep New Blood Interactive on your radar. The performance on the Steam Deck is near flawless and is truly a wonder to play. If you enjoy FPS games, I can guarantee DUSK will be an unforgettable experience. 

SDHQ's Build Score Breakdown

DUSK has been one of my most fondest gaming experiences in the past few years, so it is amazing how well it plays on the Steam Deck!

Performance: 
VISUALS: 
Stability: 
Controls: 
Battery: 
Reviewed By:
Kazuki sensei
Steam Profile

SDHQ Recommended Settings

SteamOS
60 FPS
Limit
60
Refresh Rate
HRS
No
TDP Limit
No
Scaling Filter
Linear
GPU Clock
Disabled
Proton Version

No forced compatibility

Game Settings

Resolution: 1280x800

VSync: Off

Framerate Cap: Uncapped

Bilinear Filtering: Off

Bloom: Off

Light Flares: On

Retro Palette: Off

Low Spec Mode: Off

Pixelation: 2x

Projected Battery Usage and Temp
6W - 7.5W
55c - 60c
6 hours
Steam Deck Compatibility
Current Price: 
$19.99
View in Steam Store
Proton DB Rating

Other Builds & Information

Battery Build

SteamOS:

40 FPS Cap with 40 Refresh Rate

Half Rate Shading OFF

TDP Limit OFF

Linear

 

Proton Version:

No Forced Compatibility

 

Game Settings:

Same as Recommended

Projected Battery Usage/Temps:

6W - 7W

Around 65c - 70c temps for CPU and GPU

Around 6.5 hours of gameplay

Max Quality

SteamOS:

60 FPS Cap with 60 Refresh Rate

Half Rate Shading OFF

TDP Limit OFF

Linear

 

Proton Version:

No Forced Compatibility

 

Game Settings:

Resolution: 1280x800

VSync: Off
Framerate Cap: Uncapped
Bilinear Filtering: On
Bloom: On
Light Flares: On
Retro Palette: Off
Low Spec Mode: Off
Pixelation: Off

Projected Battery Usage/Temps:

8W - 9.6W

Around 55c - 60c temps for CPU and GPU

Around 4 - 4.5 hours of gameplay

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